ECS Wolf Den – a Center for Learning and Collaboration

By and for ECS clients and employees

Celebrating Earth Day

I grew up in a small town called Hohhot in Inner Mongolia, China.  Hohhot is a Mongolian name meaning “the green city.”  Indeed, in ancient times, it must have been very “green” as people would draw big white circles on exterior walls to scare away the wolves!  So the air must have been very clean then as it was when I grew up, since I could distinctly see a blueish mountain from our front yard, called “Daqing Shan,” meaning the Great Blue Mountains.

File Under: Environmental
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Wetlands: Why the Regulations?

Wetlands – Nature’s Sponges

Wetlands are protected by the Clean Water Act and regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency through the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Regulatory Division. Have you ever wondered why we protect wetlands? It’s just land that can’t be utilized for anything, right?

Well, not exactly.

File Under: Environmental
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Radon Gas - and Why You Should Test

Radon is a naturally-occurring radioactive gas that comes from the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Radon typically moves up through the ground and can enter structures through cracks or other holes in the building’s foundation. Radon can also enter your home through well water. Unfortunately, once radon gets into a structure, it can become trapped inside, thus exposing the occupants to the negative effects of this odorless, colorless gas.

File Under: Environmental
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ECS Environmental Team has Solid Roots…and is Reaching for the Sky

Exciting news! ECS is ranked 177 in ENR’s 2016 Top Environmental Firms.

This ranking is determined by the 2015 gross revenue for environmental services. The list provides other details for each firm: the percentage of overall revenue that environmental services represents, the percentage of non-U.S. revenue, the type of work that receives the largest revenue, and a breakdown of markets and clients. It is an honor to be included in the Top 200 Environmental Firms List for 2016, and ECS is pleased have improved in rank since 2015.

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Wetland Permit Awareness: Threatened and Endangered Species

When planning development on a property that may have wetlands, most people understand that an environmental specialist will be needed to conduct a wetlands delineation survey and obtain a permit.

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What is a Forest Stand Delineation?

“Forest Stand Delineations” differ among various states. While requirements and processes vary, the general goals are consistent regardless of location. For purposes of this discussion, we’ll focus on what it means in Maryland.

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Federal Agency Clarifies Bat Rule

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) recently issued their Final 4(d) rule concerning the Northern Long Eared Bat.

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Hydrogeology - Part II

As a recap, the hydrogeologist utilizes a variety of tools to select the best available well drilling location(s). The hydrologist analyses all the gathered documentation and field data, which includes a thorough review of aerial photography of the sites under consideration. Using their knowledge of geologic formations and landscape features, they identify one or more target locations that have good potential for the development of high yield wells.

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So…what exactly is Hydrogeology?

Say that you’re a growing municipality. It’s a great place to live, and people are flocking to your county because of the wonderful climate, available jobs, and healthy economy. New housing projects and office buildings are springing up everywhere. Life is good. There’s just one problem…

You’ve almost reached the current capacity of your municipal water supply.

File Under: Environmental
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Mold Primer

The mere mention of the word ‘mold’ tends to cause anxiety about the quality of the air we breathe in our homes and workplaces. Many of us have seen pictures of black mold growing on walls in homes that have been flooded, but did you know that even homes that don’t have mold growing on the walls still have millions of microscopic spores floating in the air? These spores are released as the result of fungi reproduction. They are relatively harmless until they settle on wet or damp organic surfaces.

File Under: Environmental
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