ECS Wolf Den – a Center for Learning and Collaboration

By and for ECS clients and employees

Firestopping

Firestopping is the proper use and installation of rated systems designed to limit the movement of flame, heat, smoke and/or toxic gases in a building during a fire. Defective or missing firestopping can result in injury to building occupants and firefighters and can allow property damage to extend beyond the initial containment area. Firestopping is a key component of passive fire protection systems.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Five Reasons Hogwarts Needs ECS Facilities

Dear Hogwarts,

When I was 12, I didn’t receive my Owl in the mail. As heartbroken as I was, I’ve enjoyed my life as a muggle. In particular, my career at ECS as a Facilities Engineer has taught me muggle skills and abilities that Hogwarts might find useful. Consider this my job application.

As we all know, magic has a life span before the spells weaken or are strengthened. Some problems are best fixed the muggle-way by addressing the root of the problem with hard work and a little creativity. 

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Air Barriers

Cooling and heating commercial buildings is estimated to use six to seven percent of the total energy consumed in the United States. Conservatively, it is estimated that 30% of this energy could be saved by improving the air tightness of building envelopes.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Post-Winter Maintenance

As the nice weather arrives, many people will take advantage of a little spring cleaning. This is also a good time to think about building maintenance for your commercial property during this seasonal change. Performing the post-winter tasks noted below can help extend the life of your building and its surroundings, while keeping it more comfortable and attractive for occupants and visitors.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Air Leakage Testing

Whole building air leakage testing is a quantitative test method that measures the air infiltration of a building after it has has been completely enclosed and finishes have been installed. It’s commonly known as blower door testing, because the fans are often placed in an open door frame. It’s also referred to as air barrier testing; most likely because the testing is often called for under the "07” section of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) specifications, under “Air Barrier.” The fans used for this testing are calibrated to measure air flow.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Winter Weather, Snowloads, and the Local Economy

There was a lot of discussion about the economic losses due to the recent snowstorm in the Washington, D.C. region. While the Capitol area was hit hard due to lost productivity, lost wages, and cash registers not ringing in stores and restaurants, the area was still very fortunate.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Vibration Monitoring

Blasting. Hoe ramming. Excavation. Compaction. Pile driving. Demolition. If you’re planning or working on a construction or renovation project, you’ll be conducting at least one of these activities. While each is distinctly different, all share one thing in common: They all generate vibrations.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Why You Need a Property Condition Assessment Before Closing

Imagine yourself in this situation…

A slick, well-written brochure shows up on your desk. Someone is selling a property and has provided you with information on tenants, the great location, and basic building information. This piques your interest. What should you do next?

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Window Washers Leap Tall Buildings in a Single Bound – Safely!

Have you ever been walking down the street, looked up, and wondered if that window washer was crazy? Window cleaning is an industry assumed to be hazardous because it ‘looks dangerous’ to rappel in an urban environment. It requires care, focus, and attention to safety requirements, but in fact, it’s actually a relatively safe working environment.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)

Air Barriers

Heating and cooling commercial buildings is estimated to use six to seven percent of the total energy consumed in the United States. Conservatively, it is estimated that 30% of this energy could be saved by improving the air tightness of building envelopes.

File Under: Facilities
Comments: (0)
1 of 2