ECS Wolf Den – a Center for Learning and Collaboration

By and for ECS clients and employees

Window Washers Leap Tall Buildings in a Single Bound – Safely!

Have you ever been walking down the street, looked up, and wondered if that window washer was crazy? Window cleaning is an industry assumed to be hazardous because it ‘looks dangerous’ to rappel in an urban environment. It requires care, focus, and attention to safety requirements, but in fact, it’s actually a relatively safe working environment.

File Under: Facilities
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EPA Lead Based Paint Regulations - Renovation, Repair, Painting (RRP) Rule

Lead is highly toxic and affects virtually every system of the human body. Children are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning. The most common route of lead exposure is ingesting dust from lead-based paint (LBP) deterioration. Building renovations and demolitions can disturb LBP.

File Under: Environmental
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GeoVirginia Conference: “Lessons Learned in Geotechnical Engineering”

GeoVirginia is a geotechnical conference focused on lessons learned from case histories. The main goal of the conference is to learn from things that went right or wrong (failures) during the design and construction of projects. Hosted every 18 months by the Virginia Geo-Institute Chapter of the ASCE, the conference was created in late 2010 by a committee appointed by Virginia G-I Chapter Chair Roger A. Failmezger, P.E., F.ASCE. The conference is held in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia.

File Under: Geotechnical
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Cold Weather Concrete

With the approach of winter, it’s time to remember cold weather concreting practices. According to the American Concrete Institute® (ACI)’s publication, “Guide to Cold Weather Concreting,” (ACI 306R) cold weather is defined as any time the air temperature falls or is expected to fall below 40°F during the protection period (the time required to prevent concrete from being affected by exposure to cold weather).

File Under: Materials Testing
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Air Barriers

Heating and cooling commercial buildings is estimated to use six to seven percent of the total energy consumed in the United States. Conservatively, it is estimated that 30% of this energy could be saved by improving the air tightness of building envelopes.

File Under: Facilities
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NGOZI - Being A Blessing

From Left : Baffour Awuah (NGOZI-Executive Secretary), Alice Gyamfi (Bright Foundation-Vice President), Anim Addo-Sampong (NGOZI-President), Mike Yeatts (PWSI-Executive Secretary), Doiminic O. Agyepong (NGOZI-Vice President) and Senya Donkor (Bright Foundation-President).

File Under: Employee Spotlight
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Firestopping

photo courtesy Copper Range, Inc.

A significant change relating to firestopping was made in the 2012 International Building Code (IBC). Since many states and municipalities have or are in the process of adopting this version of the IBC, designers, contractors and inspection agencies need to be aware of these changes.

File Under: Facilities
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Building in Karst Environments

Karst is a term used to describe an area where limestone bedrock has eroded in an irregular manner. This irregular erosion is caused by the dissolution of limestone, which occurs as water is transported through the rock. As a result, these areas are often characterized by extremely variable rock surfaces, rock pinnacles, solution channels, sinkholes, and caves that may not be able to adequately support the proposed site improvements and buildings.

File Under: Geotechnical
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Hot Weather Concrete

In the concrete business, hot weather creates situations that require special procedures for proper mixing, placing, finishing, and curing. Hot weather conditions include high ambient air temperatures, high concrete temperatures, low relative humidity, and/or high winds. Any of these conditions can impair the quality of freshly-mixed or placed concrete, and this blog discusses the effects of hot weather, as well as construction practices that may help lessen their impacts.

File Under: Materials Testing
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Chesapeake Bay TMDL

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website(http://www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/tmdl/), “A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) calculates the maximum amount of a pollutant that a body of water can receive while still meeting water quality standards.” The multi-faceted Chesapeake Bay TMDL is the first of its kind in the country, and the details of its implementation are still being worked out years after its release.

File Under: Environmental
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